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WHAT IS A CO-OCCURRING TREATMENT PROGRAM?

About 10 million people in the U.S. live with co-occurring disorders. Co-occurring disorders can be treated with integrated recovery treatment plans.

Table of Contents

CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS

People diagnosed with a substance use disorder (an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol) may also be struggling with an additional psychiatric issue. This is referred to as having co-occurring disorders.
Having two or more mental health disorders simultaneously is sometimes referred to as “dual disorders.” The terms are often used interchangeably.
A substance use disorder (SUD) is itself a mental disorder as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Having a SUD affects an individual’s ability to control their behavior regarding prescribed or illegal drugs and alcohol.1
Living with both substance use disorders and mental disorders is common. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that about half of those who experience a SUD also experience a co-occurring mental disorder. 2

Introduction to Co-Occurring Disorders

Common Risk Factors of Both Suds and Other Mental Health Disorders

Though co-occurring conditions are common, it should not be assumed that one issue causes the other, though one may contribute to the other.
For example, people with anxiety and mood disorders may self-medicate their symptoms with drugs or alcohol. Using substances as a treatment for co-occurring disorders ultimately makes both conditions worse.
Genetics and environmental stressors such as trauma are the two major risk factors for developing a SUD or other mental health disorder. In addition, drug or alcohol use can alter brain chemistry, increasing the risk of developing a mental health disorder.
The two conditions are closely linked and treating one problem without treating the other makes long-term sobriety nearly impossible.
Admitting to a substance use disorder is difficult and comes with a social stigma. Being diagnosed with a mental health disorder is also challenging and can be stigmatizing.
Don’t let shame or a lack of understanding stop you from getting the support you need to improve your mental health and quality of life. Start by contacting a dual-diagnosis treatment center for more information.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS?

Group Therapy Techniques
Noticing signs of a mental health disorder in someone actively abusing drugs or alcohol can be difficult because many symptoms overlap. Symptoms of a substance disorder can easily mask the symptoms of mental illness and vice versa.
Having two or more mental health disorders simultaneously is sometimes referred to as “dual disorders.” The terms are often used interchangeably.
A substance use disorder (SUD) is itself a mental disorder as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Having a SUD affects an individual’s ability to control their behavior regarding prescribed or illegal drugs and alcohol.1
Living with both substance use disorders and mental disorders is common. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that about half of those who experience a SUD also experience a co-occurring mental disorder. 2

Indicators of Co-Occurring Disorders

Though co-occurring conditions are common, it should not be assumed that one issue causes the other, though one may contribute to the other.
  • Extreme emotion
  • Unusual thoughts or behaviors
  • Retreating from relationships
  • Extreme emotion
  • Extreme emotion
  • Extreme emotion

Physical Manifestations of Co-Occurring Disorders

Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.

DUAL DIAGNOSIS VS. CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS — WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES?

The terms “dual diagnosis” and “co-occurring disorders” are used interchangeably and mean almost the same thing. Comparing the two is somewhat like comparing red apples to green apples.
Dual diagnosis is a broad term. It can refer to having more than one mental health disorder, more than one physical health problem, or a combination of mental health and physical health issues.

Common Risk Factors of Both Suds and Other Mental Health Disorders

Though co-occurring conditions are common, it should not be assumed that one issue causes the other, though one may contribute to the other.
For example, people with anxiety and mood disorders may self-medicate their symptoms with drugs or alcohol. Using substances as a treatment for co-occurring disorders ultimately makes both conditions worse.
Genetics and environmental stressors such as trauma are the two major risk factors for developing a SUD or other mental health disorder. In addition, drug or alcohol use can alter brain chemistry, increasing the risk of developing a mental health disorder.
The two conditions are closely linked and treating one problem without treating the other makes long-term sobriety nearly impossible.
Admitting to a substance use disorder is difficult and comes with a social stigma. Being diagnosed with a mental health disorder is also challenging and can be stigmatizing.
Don’t let shame or a lack of understanding stop you from getting the support you need to improve your mental health and quality of life. Start by contacting a dual-diagnosis treatment center for more information.

Common Risk Factors of Both Suds and Other Mental Health Disorders

Though co-occurring conditions are common, it should not be assumed that one issue causes the other, though one may contribute to the other.
For example, people with anxiety and mood disorders may self-medicate their symptoms with drugs or alcohol. Using substances as a treatment for co-occurring disorders ultimately makes both conditions worse.
Genetics and environmental stressors such as trauma are the two major risk factors for developing a SUD or other mental health disorder. In addition, drug or alcohol use can alter brain chemistry, increasing the risk of developing a mental health disorder.
The two conditions are closely linked and treating one problem without treating the other makes long-term sobriety nearly impossible.
Admitting to a substance use disorder is difficult and comes with a social stigma. Being diagnosed with a mental health disorder is also challenging and can be stigmatizing.
Don’t let shame or a lack of understanding stop you from getting the support you need to improve your mental health and quality of life. Start by contacting a dual-diagnosis treatment center for more information.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MOST COMMON CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS?

Noticing signs of a mental health disorder in someone actively abusing drugs or alcohol can be difficult because many symptoms overlap. Symptoms of a substance disorder can easily mask the symptoms of mental illness and vice versa.
Having two or more mental health disorders simultaneously is sometimes referred to as “dual disorders.” The terms are often used interchangeably.
A substance use disorder (SUD) is itself a mental disorder as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Having a SUD affects an individual’s ability to control their behavior regarding prescribed or illegal drugs and alcohol.1
Living with both substance use disorders and mental disorders is common. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that about half of those who experience a SUD also experience a co-occurring mental disorder. 2

Physical Manifestations of Co-Occurring Disorders

Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.

Physical Manifestations of Co-Occurring Disorders

Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
Symptoms of a co-occurring disorder can also manifest as physical health problems. Complaints of back pain, headaches, stomach pain, or other aches and pains are common. A dual-diagnosis treatment center has experienced medical experts who care for psychiatric and physical symptoms.
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